Pompey Shoreline


I have been trawling through my old photo’s. This one does not exhibit anything special, photographically. But it does contain some interesting buildings/structures, demonstrating how Portsmouth has changed through the years.Pompey_Shore_DSC02193.JPG_Adjusted

Starting at the lower left, the white building, is Quebec House which was built c1754 by public subscription as a bathing house !!! It apparently contains baths which were replenished by harbour water.

I’m not sure I would have wanted to bathe in waters from the harbour, in times past. It would be dubious even in todays era with our modern sewer systems.

Up, and to the right of Quebec House, the tallest building at 560 feet, is The Spinnaker Tower. Conceived as a Millenium project it was given the go ahead in 1995. One of three designs which the local people could vote for, the Spinnaker won 60% of the votes. Various obstacles delayed the start of construction which commenced in November of 2001. The project was completed and finally opened in 2005. Named The Spinnaker, it represents a sail billowing in the wind. The tower is visible from over 23 miles away and its three viewing platforms give fabulous views overlooking the harbour, Portsmouth Historic Dockyard, the Isle of Wight and all the surrounding towns and suburbs.

Back down at sea level and running left to right is the Round Tower and The Hot Walls. Part of the ports old fortifications the Round Tower overlooks the entrance to the Harbour. Although a tower, built of wood, existed in the mid 1400’s, a stone tower was constructed in the 1490’s. A series of ramparts were later added, connecting with the Square Tower (just out of shot). The small section of beach below these ramparts, to the right, is called the “Hot Walls” by locals, as it acts as a sun trap heating up the walls.

Yet another change of architectural style, the tall blue tower, above the Hot Walls. Officially known as East Side Plaza Tower, it is commonly referred to as The Lipstick Tower because of its shape. This residential tower is 331 feet tall and was completed in 2008.

I hope this was of interest to you. I’ll see if I can dig out some more photos.

Marine Lake – West Kirby


Spent a glorious afternoon at Dunham Massey, here in the North of England. By the time we arrived back at our base, Moreton, nobody wanted to prepare a meal. So we took off down to West Kirby, where we picked up some Fish n Chips. Then headed down to the promenade to eat them. What could be better on a warm evening than taking in the views, looking towards North Wales over marine lake and the Dee estuary.

There were many sail boats on the lake, which was about as flat as a mill pond.

And with little wind it made for a very tranquil scene.

Sadly the Welsh coastline was obscured by mist with just a few twinkling lights managing to break through the murk.

As for the Fish n Chips, they were superb. We got them from Marigolds in West Kirby

Smokin


Had a meat delivery today, from Donald Russell, the Scottish butchers.

The meats are always packed with dry ice, although the little packs are quite often depleted by the time I get to open the packaging.

Today, there was a fair bit remaining. So I thought I would have a little fun.

Dry ice creates some amazing effects.

View From The Conservatory


Today’s view is actually inside the conservatory.

I was first drawn to the frantic buzzing of what I thought may be a hornet. Thankfully it turned out to be the sound of this beautiful creature trying to beat it’s way through the glazing of our conservatory roof. I really didn’t want to rile a hornet that wouldn’t know that I was trying to help it.

So, using a stiff piece of paper, I tried to guide this creature outside.

After much dodging and darting about, he settled on the floor …..

Dragonfly

More dodging and darting and he was, frustratingly, back up by the glass ….

Dragonfly

Clearly, my bit of paper wasn’t up to the job in hand.

A change of tactic and I tried to use a big floppy yellow dust mop. In my mind it would look like a flower and after a couple of false starts I succeeded in carrying the dragonfly outside. At which point he took off and was last seen flying in a southerly direction.

I dread to think what my neighbours might have thought, of my gyrations in the utility area, waving a bright yellow mop in the air !!!

Southsea Castle Lunch


Fine weather, and a luncheon date with our daughter, took us down to Southsea.

A short stroll across Southsea Common and we arrived at Southsea Castle.

This is where Henry VIII watched Mary Rose, the pride of his fleet, founder and sink.

The castle is now home to The Courtyard, a good quality restaurant. Due to ongoing Covid precautions we waited to be seated by a very pleasant member of staff.

We were served our drinks …

Pimms O’clock

….. followed shortly by our chosen meals …

…. mine was this very delicious Bhudda Bowl.

The girls had Scampi and a Southern style burger.

Appetites suitably satisfied we made a short tour of the castle walls …

Down from the ramparts and a short detour, by me, to take a quick look at one of Southsea’s newest attractions.

LCT 7074 is the last surviving landing craft tank in the UK. LCT 7074 is an amphibious assault ship for landing tanks, other vehicles and troops on beachheads. Built in 1944 by Hawthorn Leslie and Company, Hebburn, the Mark 3 LCT 7074 was part of the 17th LCT Flotilla during Operation Neptune in June 1944.

WIKIPEDIA

Not one for the girls, I have pencilled in a return visit, for when I am on my own.

Then it was a gentle stroll back to my daughters flat for a cuppa. Before venturing out to do battle with the evening traffic as we wended our way home.

%d bloggers like this: