Cafe on the Dam


Took a trip out to Serpentine Dam and had lunch at the Cafe on the Dam. Here are a few of the locals who joined us for lunch ……

Carnarvon To Exmouth


 

One of the features of Carnarvon is the One Mile Jetty and at the landward end is the Jetty Railway Museum. We couldn’t spare the time to visit the museum but I took a few photos of some of the vehicles dotted around the outside.

Back to the trip, after a buffet breakfast at the Carnarvon Motel, we headed out onto the North West Coastal Highway to continue our trek up to the north. Once again we topped up with fuel and set off.

We hadn’t been on the road for very long when I felt the need to stop and snap off a few photos. Carnarvon sits on the Gascoyne River and the road out-of-town crosses the dried up river bed.

 

While I was taking my snaps the local parrot population was very vocal, heckling me from every vantage point.

Once more en-route and after an hours motoring I felt the need to empty my bladder. So cue my visit to a bush loo. This one was at Yandoo Creek …….

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Bush Loo – Yandoo Creek, WA

As an aside I have noted, regarding Australia’s public loo’s in remote places, is that they tend to be clean, not smelly or vandalised. Quite often they have toilet paper and sometimes even soap and water. The reason I mention this is that coming from the UK I find it surprising.  Typically, back home, any loo in as remote a place as the Yandoo Creek example, would have been vandalised and covered in graffiti. They don’t even have to be remote to have been trashed.

Well done Australia and shame on you UK.

Our journey continued and, after another 80 kilometers, our next stop was Minilya Bridge Roadhouse.

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Minilya Bridge Roadhouse

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Minilya Bridge Roadhouse

After a snack, comprising some dubious sandwiches and a Magnum each, we continued on our way. A short distance  up the road we left the North West Coastal Highway and struck out onto the Minilya-Exmouth Road and after approximately 50 kilometers further we crossed the Tropic of Capricorn.

What a pair of posers !!

Moving on we started to see new features in the countryside …..

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Termite Nests

We started off seeing the odd one or two nests alongside the road. The further we travelled, the more we saw. There were literally thousands of these nests, scattered as far as the eye could see. And they aren’t small …

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Termite Nest

Termite mounds – Each mound is an entire kingdom, complete with a king, queen, soldiers, workers and thriving cities. Millions of termites may live in a single mound and each termite has a role of its own in maintaining their complex social environment e.g. worker termites (smallest) build the mound using dirt and saliva. They have no eyes or ears but work by smell. They make tunnels to help keep the mound cool. These mounds can last up to 100 years. The King and Queen have their own room and the soldier termites keep quard outside their door. The King and Queen can live up to 30 years.

The above description was taken from an information board via this blog

Eventually we arrived in Exmouth and located our accommodation for the next two nights, the Ningaloo Lodge.

 

Mundaring Weir Hotel


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Mundaring Weir Hotel – WA

We have, over the years, visited Mundaring Weir on many occasions. We have not, however, eaten at the Mundaring Weir Hotel which is just a few minutes away from the weir. So we decided to give them a try for lunch.

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Mundaring Weir Hotel

Apparently, there has been an establishment on this site since the turn of the century and was originally built to service the workers and visitors to the weir. In 1898 a single storey building called the Reservoir Hotel was built. Then in 1906, a two-storey building was added and the hotel was renamed Goldfields Weir Hotel. Not sure when it was renamed again but whatever name it is sporting the building still retains much of the decor and character of the original.

Food is only served during the day and it is what they term “counter food”. Back home in the UK I guess we would just refer to bar meals.

I had the Steak Sandwich which is described as “Graziers porterhouse steak with onion jam, cheddar cheese, beetroot & rocket with BBQ and ranch dressings. Served with chips”.

Gerry and Denise both had the Snapper Burger “with lemon & dill aoili, lettuce, chopped salad and beer battered chips”

All agreed that the food was very good although we would have preferred the food to have been served on plates rather than the wooden board which allowed the food to slide of onto the table. The star of these meals was the beer battered chips which were crisp on the outside and full and fluffy on the inside.

The girls each had a “midi” of refreshing Orchard Crush apple cider while I had a midi of an amber ale called Nine Tales . Both brews are from the James Squire Brewery. One thing I can vouch for is that Australian craft beers are seriously good and a long way removed from the horrendous lagers, such as Fosters, which they insist on exporting to us.

Mundaring is about an hours drive out from Perth and the road out to the hotel takes you though picturesque woodlands interspersed with open farmlands.

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Farmland near Piesse Brook, Kalamunda

On a previous trip out to this area we had encountered kangaroos crossing the road. On this occasion we spotted a much more diminutive creature, a Bobtail Lizard.

Apparently these fellows are quite often kept as pets but come with a government health warning  “CAUTION: These lizards can deliver a painful and bloody bite”. See this video.

Around the hotel grounds I came across these guys ….

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Parrot B-B-Q

After a BBQ lunch what do you need, why a nice cold beer of course….

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I Just Dropped In For A Swifty

These guys are obviously quite used to humans around the hotel grounds. They let me get quite close before taking off to the nearby trees.

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Who you looking at ?

All in all a pleasant afternoon.

Well pleasant except for the flies which were very much in evidence whenever we stepped out of our car.